Tube-Cube. 
I remember thinking how cool the Mac Cube was when I first saw it. Then later I thought it looked a lot like my bread maker. I know they had some manufacturing problems (cracks, overheating), but it was such a bold design.  The new Mac Pro is its successor. Regardless of whether you like it or hate it, you must admit only Apple would take the chance and build it.

Tube-Cube. 

I remember thinking how cool the Mac Cube was when I first saw it. Then later I thought it looked a lot like my bread maker. I know they had some manufacturing problems (cracks, overheating), but it was such a bold design.  The new Mac Pro is its successor. Regardless of whether you like it or hate it, you must admit only Apple would take the chance and build it.

ISPs don’t understand cloud data

If there is a weakness in the recent trend towards keeping your data in the cloud, it is that ISPs are still living in the pre-cloud days of asynchronous bandwidth. They assume, or rather work very hard to enforce that you download much more data than you upload. A typical high speed connection these days will give you 25mbps of download speed but only 2mbps of upload. That might be fine if all you do is surf the web and watch Netflix, but what if you decide to sign up for one of those shiny online cloud backup services like Crashplan for Backblaze, or want to move all your data to infinite storage with Bitcasa? At 2mbps up, it will take a long, long time to backup your data. On top of that almost all ISPs are starting to enforce data caps now. It is not uncommon to see a 100 - 200 GB per month transfer limit with large overage fees. This type of restriction used to be limited to mobile data access. Image if you had a hard-drive failure and actually had to restore from your cloud backup? That could be a very expensive proposition.

Until ISPs catch up with current trends the promise of all your data ‘in the cloud’ won’t truly be realized.